Review: Memory Man (By David Baldacci)

 

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Source: Pan Macmillan

 

Length: 403 pages

My rating: 4 out of 5 stars

An injury suffered during his first professional game ended Amos Decker’s football career before it had a chance to begin. It also gave him the incredible ability to never forget anything. The ability was a gift for twenty years as it made him the great cop and Detective he was. But the day he returned home to find his wife and daughter murdered, that gift turned into a curse. The killer was never caught and the motive remained unknown.

Unable to forget any detail of the night, Decker lost everything and wound up homeless on the streets of Burlington. Sixteen months after the incident, he’d barely picked himself up, taking up a few jobs as a PI, when his old partner tells him that a man has confessed to the murder of his wife and child. Decker barely has a chance to come to terms with the news when tragedy strikes the town yet again. The local high school is attacked by a shooter. Teenagers are shot dead, and the killer slips away. The cops enlist Decker’s help because they believe that his ability could help them. But as the investigation progresses, the cops, FBI, and Decker discover that the shootings were related to the murder of sixteen months ago. And Decker is at the center of a dangerous game orchestrated by a killer who’s not done with his list yet.

My take:

Memory Man has been on my to-read list for a while now. And now I’m wondering why exactly I hadn’t picked it up sooner.

Like with all of Baldacci’s work, Memory Man is a complex story with numerous angles that are interwoven masterfully. The story isn’t your run-of-the-mill vengeance thriller. It’s more complex, deeper, and plays over a much larger picture. Interesting twists, some predictable but more not so, keep you turning the pages furiously. It touches upon conditions such as hyperthymesia and the information (while mostly molded to suit the requirements of the story) is presented in a way that gives you great insight into what the persons who may have such conditions actually go through.

What I loved about the book, though, was not its story, but its characters. Memory Man has complex characters that have a number of layers. Each character holds its own and pulls you into his or her story – this is equally true of the protagonist and antagonist, and evreryone else too. Baldacci doesn’t paint a hero versus villain story. He tells the story of people who are simply human and who have been shaped into whatever they are by the events of their life. He shows how empathy, anger, hatred, and love may never be found where most required and anticipated, and yet may be existent where least expected. And he tells the story of people so realistically that a part of you is forced to wonder whether human beings are really human at all.

The story moves along briskly, with no breathers. You’ll be turning pages long into the night because it is difficult to put Memory Man down. And at the end of it, what stays with you is not the story, but the complicated and deep characters that made it. To wrap up, all I can say is that I’ve read only his young adult work recently, and I am so very glad that I picked up Memory Man. It’s more along the lines of what I’ve always loved about Baldacci’s story-telling prowess and made me realize just how much I missed reading his books.

Don’t miss out on Memory Man if you:

  • have enjoyed any of Baldacci’s previous work (it’s one of his better ones)
  • like intricately designed and neatly interwoven thrillers/mysteries with numerous angles
  • want to try out Baldacci for the first time (it’s a great place to start)

Have you read Memory Man? Let us know what you thought about it in the comments below.

P.S: I think this could make a good movie. What do you think?

– Rishika

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1 Comment

Filed under Book reviews

One response to “Review: Memory Man (By David Baldacci)

  1. Ohh this book is real good !
    He has narrated the story really well.❤
    And the behaviour of characters here are quite complex and fishy.
    A story of revenge!

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